About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
KRCB (PBS) 56
LANGUAGE
English 56
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)
mitt romney gets focused and locked in, watch out. >> stories of family... >> stanley ann dunham was really a thoroughly unconventional mother. >> he had to fend for himself. every step, he was alone. >> the dad stuff just can't be underestimated. >> he had a lot of power to him. he was our hero. >> identity... >> he told his fifth-grade class that his father was an indonesian king. >> he was a white-black kid. >> his extended family is one of the leading mormon families. >> he can't talk about it because it involves polygamy. >> controversy... >> he's the first nobel peace prize winner with a kill list. >> mitt romney doesn't have an ideological bone in his body, as far as i can tell. >> and destiny. >> what unites both of these characters is this sense that there was a place that they were going, a destiny that they had. >> tonight ofrontline, "the choice 2012." >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. maca
. a closely fought campaign between president barack obama, and mitt romney, the former massachusetts governor, has come down to this night when tens of millions of voters finally have their say. >> ifill: it's just after 8:00 eastern time and the polls have now closed in almost half the states and the district of columbia, including 15 states that closed just hometowns ago. >> woodruff: there are now some fresh results to share with you, based on exit polling in key precincts and early returns, the networks have called the state of georgia for mitt romney. this is not a surprise. this is a state that went to john mccain four years ago, but just to recap, the state of kentucky has also been called for governor romney. the state of vermont going to barack obama, again, not a surprise. this is a very blue state. west virginia for governor romney. and i believe we have one other state, south carolina. all of these states so far, again, i guess you would kay, gwen, in the predictable column-- and indiana, one other state we have been able to call-- rather the associated press, or the networks. our
effort, and you had mitt romney last year on the campaign saying he would get rid of fema, he would turn the responsibilities back to the states, showing no appreciation for the role that fema place. >> this is a nightmare for political candidate romney. >> it is, especially if you are going after swing votes, woman voters in ohio, the so-called waitress a vote. they want a president who will care for them and be a guardian. this is an ad for a president who worries about you. it is terrible for romney. it stopped his momentum. maybe the polls or all wrong and romney is going to win anyway, but if you looking at the polls right now, obama has got it. >> did ghani have momentum, was that republican --romney of momentum, or was that republican spin? >> he definitely add momentum after the first debate. >> we ve had thr sin then. i wish i could say definitively that there is momentum ornamented i cannot tell. there are polls every hour on the hour, and you just get a sense that this is very tight, even when you go to some of the battle ground states. >> what do you make of this, mark? >> ye
93% of african-americans, a 71% of hispanics, more women than romney. he won 52% of voters under 34. half the independent voters. 54% of those who make over $100,000 a year. first we will hear from the president. >> i believe we can lead this future together because we are not as divided as our politics suggest. we are greater than the sum of our individual ambitions. >> we will get to the campaign and mitt romney in a minute, but first listen to what john boehner said after the election. >> mr. president, this is your moment. we are ready to be led. not as democrats or republicans, but as americans. let's rise above the this function and do the right thing for our country. >> later john maynard told diane sawyer he is the most reasonable, responsible person -- john boehner told diane sawyer he is the most reasonable, responsible person in washington and the president knows that. the fiscal cliff looms at the end of the year. will we reach a compromise before then, charles? >> i do not think it will be a comprehensive compromise. i think they will be able to patch something together
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: president obama and mitt romney sprinted through swing states making their final arguments on this day before election day. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we start with two reports from the candidates' command centers. ray suarez is in illinois, and margaret warner is in massachusetts. >> suarez: at obama campaign headquarters in chicago, they're confident of a narrow win. >> romney's strategists are counting on the undecided independent voters breaking his way. >> ifill: then, thousands of people in new york and new jersey are still without power, cold and in the dark even as schools and businesses reopen. kwame holman has our update, one week after the storm. >> woodruff: and special correspondent rick karr tells the story of a hard-hit brooklyn neighborhood struggling to get back on its feet. >> ifill: back on the campaign trail, we head to ohio, the ultimate battleground state, whervolunteersn both sides took to the streets this weekend. >> now that we
assess the tactics that led to success for the obama campaign and failure for mitt romney. >> ifill: we examine the messages voters sent yesterday with jeffrey brown, who looks at the makeup of congress and the new laws around the country. >> woodruff: what to do about the fiscal cliff, healthcare and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. d bcontbutns to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour
's favor. 52% of women and 44% of men support obama. while the g.o.p.'s mitt romney has 44% of women and1% of men in his corner. women voters in battleground states are the coveted demographic according to two campaign experts. >> i think if you look at the president has done with the economy, it is very far reaching, just across the country women have access to capital to start small business, let's not forget his very, very first bill that he signed in to law was lily ledbetter fair pay act. it's a tremendous accomplishment. i think that shows his devotion and his commitment to women. >> first thing you have to ask is, what are women concerned about today, it's jobs, job security, opportunities for themselves and for their loved ones and in particular for their kidss there a brighter future. this is mitt romney's message to women to all americans. is that he is going to put in to place economic policies that will create growth which will create the jobs, be the ergy to small businesses start growing again. >> we asked the experts whether reproductive rights is a decisive issue for women
on woman's right to choose and marriage equality as evidence of a vision different from that of mitt romney. the news came as the president returned to the campaign trail, stopping first in green bay, wisconsin. he revived his own slogan of 2008 to question mitt romney's ideas. >> governor romney has been using all his talents as a salesman to dress up these very same policies that failed our country so badly, the very same policies we've been cleaning up after for the past four years. and he is offering them up as change. ( laughter ) he's... he's saying he's the candidate of change. well, let me tell you, wisconsin, we know what change looks like. ( cheers and applause ) and what the governor's offering sure ain't change. >> woodruff: polls currently give the president a slight edge in wisconsin. but nationally, they are mostly dead even. romney spent his day in virginia, a tied state, telling a crowd in roanoke, that the president is clueless when it comes to business. >> and so we came up with an idea last week, which is he's going to create the department of business. ( laughter ) i do
obama and governor romney have spent the day drumming up last-minute support in battleground states. >> you may be frustrated at the pace of change. i promise you, so am i sometimes. but you know that i say what i mean and i mean what i say. (cheers and applause) i said i'd tend war in iraq and i ended it. i said i'd pass health care reform. i passed it. (cheers and applause) i said i'd repeal "don't ask, don't tell." we repealed it. (cheers and applause) i said we'd crack down on reckless practices on wall street and we did. (applause) soou know where i stand. you know what i believe. you know i tell the truth. and you know that i'll fight for you and your families every single day as hard as i know how. you know that about me. (cheers and applause) >> you see, talk is cheap but a record, that's real and it's earned with real effort. (cheers and applause) i mean, the president promised a lot of change, but change can't be measured in speeches, it has to be measured in achievements and four years ago candidate obama promised to do oh so very much but he's fallen oh so very short. i
wanted romney to denounce it. women wanted the party to denounce it, and romney never came out to denounce it. bottom line is this -- we played it too safe, we didn't think women were monolithic voters or cared about the economy, but when it comes to legitimate rape and abortion, women stood together. >> i wish that's all it was, really, but the whole year, particularly when republicans took over so many state legislators, that's when the war on women, if you forgive me, began. you had record numbers of anti-contraceptive and and antiabortion laws, even a tax on equal pay laws, the congress with the blunt amendment on where they actually had a vote on whether or not insurance policies ought to include contraception if theoss is in disagreement. so you can talk messenger all you want to or two members who clearly revealed the rubbish in the republican party, but, let's face it, women had a whole year, and then they had the republican primary to see it big and bold -- all anti-woman, personhood -- all the things the majority of the women are clearly not for. >> okay, but let me a
month of job growth, while mitt romney cited an up-tick in the unemployment rate as proof of an economic standstill. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, with the final data before election day now out, we look at the overall jobs picture in america, and how the candidates are and are not addressing it. >> woodruff: then, long gas lines, continuing power outages, and massive cleanup efforts in the northeast. ray suarez updates the slow climb back after the storm. >> brown: ordinary citizens, some of them school children, caught in the crossfire in syria's ar. margaret warner has our report. >> as syrian rebels expand the areas they control, the assad regime has turned to long-range artillery and air attacks to hit the opposition and civilians as well. >> woodruff: we have a "battleground" dispatch from iowa, where immigration is rarely mentioned by the candidates, but is on the minds of voters. >> although latinos make up only 5% of iowa's population, their numbers have increased by 110% over the last ten years. >> brown: plus mark sh
that people voted for obama over romney was that they were concerned about climate change and they felt he was a better candidate on climate change. we had a terrible, terrible candidate on climate change and we had a candidate on climate change who needs a lot of pressure. so i feel more optimistic than i did in 2008 because in 2008 the attitude of the environmental movement was our guy just got in and we need to support him and he's going to give us the legislation that we want and we'll take his advice and we're going to be good little soldiers and now maybe i'm being overly optimistic, but i think people learn the lesson of the past four years and people now understand that what obama needs and what we need, forget what obama needs is a real independent movement with climate change at its center and it will put pressure the entire political class and there's no waiting around for obama to do it for you. >> why would you think that the next four years of a lame duck president would be more successful from your standpoint than the first four years when he's looking for reelection? >> wel
, the nasdaq rose 12, and the s&p added 11 pois. polls show that president obama and governor romney are in a tight race. ultimately, voters in a few key states will have the final say on who wins the white house. florida is one of those important battleground states. tom is in miami with more. tom. >> tom: susie, florida is the biggest swing state prize with the most electoral votes up for grabs. the economy, healthcare and immigration all are on display re wh flida'diverse and growing population. voters in south florida today packed their umbrellas for the hot sun, and patience in some precincts. it's been a tight race in the sunshine state. compared to four years ago, it was a harder time deciding whom to vote for, for her. >> this time it came to the nitty gritty, they were fighting about real things, jobs, health care and i think they both have very good points. >> reporter: for her the decision came down to health care and medical insurance coverage, supporting president obama's effort to reform the industry. but natalie felt differently. >> there's a lot of changes in health c
romney win will be a big win for stock prices. >> i think when you see new regimes, new presidents come in to play in sort of a turmoil time, that change is always viewed as good and the market views that as good news. >> reporter: on the other hand, corpina doesn't think the re- election of president obama will trigger a selloff. more likely he would expect to see status quo for stocks. >> i think people have bought into the fact that the market is going to take a long time to recover, our economy is going to take a long time to recover and the market has seemed to stay on the track so to speak. >> reporter: of course there is also the possibility however remote, that it might take days before we know who will occupy the oval office. that's a scary flash back to the hanging chad debacle of the 2000 election. >> i think the odds are against it. i shudder to think. but, you remember how bad it was back in 2000. it was crazy, it drove people crazy, it drove the market crazy. i don't think that happens. i think one of these guys wins handily. >> reporter: and, then there are those who beli
download. >> take a look at this, the obama campaign spent $47 million on digital sending. and the romney campaign spent 4 my 7 million. a 10 to 1 gap. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes, it's obvious, and sometimes, it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> bnsf railway support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station fromiers like you
, is there a deal in the works? mitt romney explains why he lost . >> the president's campaign was focused on his base coalition, giving extraordinary gifts from the government, working aggressively to turn them out to vote. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> i just don't know where to begin this week. do we talk about republican charges of a cover-up with regard to the fatal attack in benghazi? do we talk about sexual liaisons and e-mails and national security? to talk about israel and gaza. the possibility of a deal to avoid going off the fiscal clf? let's art th the sex. [laughter] general david petraeus had an affair with his biographer, paula broadwell, a married mother of two pit talk about unlimited access. general petraeus was set to testify as we were recording this program, so we don't know what he said yet. >> we are safer because of the work that dave petraeus has done. my main hope right now is that he and his family are able to move on, and that this ends up being a single side note on what has otherwise been an extraordinary career. >> ordinary car
. meanwhile, governor mitt romney held a relief rally in the battleground state of ohio for victims of sandy. he urged americans outside the affected areas to help out in any way they can. inthese fil days befe e electn, both candidates are ramping up efforts to mobilize voters, including their faith-based supporters. kim lawton has been leading our coverage of the campaigns. she looks at the many ways religion has played a role this time around. >> both campaigns continue their active efforts to get their constituencies out to the polls next week. professor john green of the bliss institute at the university of akron says in a tight election, the campaigns look to the coalitions they can rely upon, and that includes faith coalitions. >> each side understands that every vote will count. >> green says while faith-based outreach hasn't dominated this campaign season, it has continued to be a key factor. >> a lot of that effort, though, is not on television. it's going on behind the scenes, because appealing to a particular group always has the capacity of alienating another group. this is true
. >> woodruff: meanwhile, republican mitt romney returned to the campaign trail today with three events in florida. the g.o.p. presidential nominee also mentioned the ongoing recovery in the northeast. >> this is... this is quite a time for the country, as you know. we're... we're going through trauma in a major part of the country, a kind of trauma you've experienced here in florida more than once. and... a it's interesting to see how people come together in a circumstance like this. we've seen folks from all over the country step forward and... and offer contributions. >> woodruff: bumps in the recovery were evident in new york city late today, where the public, bellevue hospital , started evacuating about 500 patients because of deteriorating conditions. >> ifill: and for more on fill a short time ago vernor cmo said laguaia area will open for flights tomorrow morning. today's developments, we're joined again tonight by warren levinson of the associated press. he's been making his way around new york city today, and is just back from a trip to the evacuated bellevue hospital. warren,
tightening. >>> president barack obama and mitt romney are making their final pitches before americans head to the polls. obama visited three swing states. he told a crowd in wisconsin that romney would resurrect the republican policies of four years ago and preserve tax cuts for the wealthy. >> it's a choice between returning to the top down policies that crashed our economy or a future that's built on providing opportunity to everybody and growing a strong middle class. >> romney also campaigned in swing states. he told an audience in florida that obama had failed to deliver on promises to reduce the economic burden on americans. >> tomorrow we begin a new tomorrow. tomorrow we begin a better tomorrow. this nation is going to begin to change for the better tomorrow. >> the latest poll from abc news and the washington post suggests 50% of likely voters will cast their ballots for obama. 47% for romney. polls indicate a close race in eight states. some suggest the candidates are running even. others give obama a narrow lead. >> the economy is what i think is numbe one. >> health care. >> ne
counted, but winning ohio gave the president enough electoral college votes for victory. governor romney, the former governor of massachusetts, conceded just after 1:00 a.m. >> and i ran for office because i'm concerned about america. this election is over but our principles endure. that i believe the principles upon which this nation was founded are the only sure guide to a resurgent economy and to renewed greatness. like so many of you, paul and i have left everything on the ield we have given all our to this campaign. (cheers and applause) i so wish -- i so wish that i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. but the nation chose another leader so ann and i join with you to earnestly pray for him and for this great nation. >> rose: the race revealed america's shifting fault lines. it was a national conversation carried out in a few battleground states. billions of dollars poured into theampan as both sides sought to define the other as responsible for the country's economic and partisan gridlock. but when it became clear that the long race had
largely to strong support from latino catholics. mitt romney won the white catholic vote by an almost 20-point margin. almost 80% of evangelicals who voted voted for romney. black protestants went overwhelmingly for obama, as did the vast majority of jews. but the biggest share of obama's faith coalition was voters who say they aren't affiliated with any religion. steve schneck was co-chair of catholics for obama. he says while issues like abortion, religious liberty and gay marriage were important, in the end, it was the economy that tipped the scale for the president. >> all of these religious issues, while they are important to religious voters, i think, even among religious voters, they ranked these issues a little further down on the spectrum. >> ralph reed of the faith and freedom coalition admitted that a massive mobilization among religious conservatives wasn't enough to offset the number of women, young people and minorities who voted democratic. >> i think we need to do a better job of not looking like, you know, your daddy's religious right. you know we have to be as a movemen
news. >>hio is still the granddaddy of them all. governor romney's going there the most of all the battleground state, the same with the president. right now you would have to say that the president has the better electoral map, the polls in more battleground states are favouring him. but romney is doing better in north carolina and florida, and on the early vote he's doing well in those states, doing well in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this qstio what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know what we consider theook toy is a relatively recent historical phenomenon. i totally disagree that
at the folks who voted for mitt romney, 88% of them were non hispanic whites. >> non-hispanic whites. >> exactly, non-hispanic whites, and what that implies is that when you're in these conversations among conservatives sometimes when you don't have people from these other groups who can engage in these conversations you miss a great deal. and that's one reason why there are a lot of conservatives, myself included, who believe that we do have messag, ideas d strategies tt woulbe relevant for achieving economic uplift and much else. but the problem is that when you don't have a more diverse group of people who are part of the conversation, then i think that it makes it very hard to translate that message to folks who are inclined to distrust. >> i would say that if you are going to target voters on the basis of the fact that they are african american or the fact that they are latino and try to prevent them from voting on that basis, voter suppression, that is being hostile to the interests of those groups. and if you start talking about self deportation, that is being hostile to the i
showed that mitt romney lost every demographic-- blacks, hispanics, and asians-- other than white voters, who favored the republican nominee. romney won among older voters, buthe esident led among those under age 44. and he captured 60% of the 18- to 29-year-old vote, which turned out in greater numbers than in 2008. exit polls also sampled attitudes on the tea party. 21% said they support the movement. 30% opposed it and 42% declared themselves neutral. we do our own sampling now, with three party members: leslie sanchez, a republican strategist and author of "los republicanos: why hispanics and republicans need each other." matt kibbe, president and c.o. ofreedomwork an ganition that's supported tea party rallies and promotes limited government and lower taxes. and brad dayspring, a senior adviser to the conservative super pac y.g. action fund. y-g stands for young guns. he's a former aide to house majority leader eric cantor. leslie sanchez, i want to start with you. simple question: what is the number-one lesson republicans should take from tuesday's election? >> most importantly, t
an obama and a boehner and a romney or a reid together with a relatively small number of people you could exercise serious presidential leadership even with all the other things going on in the country. >> tom and then jon. go ahead, tom. >> i'll just add to david's point. when jon meacham 20 years from now writes the biography of president obama and the first term there will surely be a chapter titled "how could bit that barack obama turned out to be the worst communicating president in american history?" i think that's been -- he himself has acknowledged he had no narrative. and i think part of it was that he was reacting to the hillary criticism, oh, he just gives speeches. part of it he was truly focused on the substance of what he did i would argue it was not all just this noise thg. i think they had a very bad communications strategy. there's a way of getting things across and repeating things. a way of explaining things like health care, a way of explaining the importance of race to the top in this year of globalization, a way of explaining the amazing deals he put through and i th
has not been supportive of israel. some people thought since benjamin netanyahu was a little pro-romney it seemed during the campaign there might be some bad blood there. but i think it has to be said over the last uple of weeks, the obama administration has been extremely supportive of israel. that's one thing. and the second thing they've done is work with the new egyptian government and that was not necessarily a done deal, either. so they've given us this cease-fire. and so we had a pretty, you know, serious military exchange. but the american-egyptian relationship was not frayed. the american-israeli relationship was not frayed. and importantly, the israeli-egyptian relationship, while frayed, is still functioning. so i think they've done a reasonably good job of stabilizing things. now, morsi has taken this opportunity to create a bit of a constitutional crisis there, and there we're going to have to stick to our guns and be the pro-reform force evening for somebody who is trying to usurp power. >> brown: does it suggest that president obama might have to spend more capital and ti
't any nine pointrogrs, either the president or governor romney. but no one can argue that barack obama did not stand clearly and unequivocally for raising the taxes on those earning over $250,000. just as mitt romney stood for repealing affordable care act. those were sort of the two linchpins. so the president does have, i think, a legitimate point of view. the speaker acknowledges that we're going to have to raise revenues. and i thought the conversation between bob corker, the republican from tennessee and ben cardin of maryland, just both re-elected was the most encouraging that i have heard in a long time. >> woodruff: worker put it in terms of closing loopholes. >> right, the senate is not the problem here. if it was up to the senate we would have a deal. and i do think there is room for revenue. there is a distinction that boehner makes between raising the rates, which the president wants to go up to 39.5 or 6 and keeping the rates the same by closing loopholes to get more revenue that way out of the rich. you can't really get as much revenue that way. but so there is some room
, romney, who said we should just have them self-deport. that is pack your bags and leave. millions of american citizen children have undocumented parents. thousands of americans are married to undocumented spouses. look, it's a destructive force our broken immigration system. but i don't think that -- in that sense it's a step in the right direction because what the senator is saying is they can stay. it's a realization that they're not simply going to disappear one day and leave the country. and that they have a rightful place in the united states of america. what we'd like to say and one of our principles as we've articulated today is we want them to be citizens of the united states and we want them to have a clear path to that. now, i understand when the senator says that they should be put at the back of t line. i get that part. look, that's why you have to do comprehensive immigration reform. because under comprehensive immigration reform we say there should be no backlog. there should be no permanent resident. there should be no citizen who has petitioned for their wife or th
to learn and surprised to elsewhere that the romney campaign did not greet the news well. they said it shows the economy is virtually at a standstill because basically the unemployment rate is where it was when obama was sworn in. now the obama administration is pointing out they created more than five million jobs since the president took office in the private sector, that is. and also, if you look a the first full month the president was in office the unemployment rate was 8.3%. now it's 7.9. >> tom: instead of arguing about the data, what about the demographics here? because polls, obviously, show this is an extremely close race going into tuesday. so what about the key voting demographics in this jobs report? >> reporter: you know, one little nugget that i thought was very interesting, the unemployment rate for white men has fall tone 6.6% and about a year ago it was 7.8%. that is a key voting demographic, but inrestingly enough, even though the unemployment rate is coming down, that demographic is going as much as two to one for romney. you know, sometimes demographic informati
romney. >> woodruff: we zero in on two topics, starting with the spiraling scandal that forced the c.i.a. director to step down. >> ifill: and we assess the administration's post-election agenda with senators dick durbin and kay bailey hutchison. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez gets the latest on the escalating violence in gaza after israeli air strikes killed the military leader of hamas. >> ifill: plus, there were new calls today for laws to police pharmacies like the one linked to the meningitis outbreak. betty ann bowser's update includes the story of one family's loss from the disease. >> i can't really think of one them them without the other. he was such a vibrant person that who lit up the room and there's such a great big hole missing. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's nehour major funng for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by theorporationor public roadsti. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the president
passed a free trade fact with south korea. but mitt romney and others say obama still hasn't done enough on issues such as the currency disparity with china. republicans say his approach to nuclear weapons is misguided. the professor says somewhere along the way, obama got sidetracked. >> like the working without nuclear weapons, he had an idea and this global vision, but middle east was so volatile and promising at the same time. during his administration. and naturally i think he was sort of shifted to that region instead of asia. >> but most americans care most about what happens at home. millions of them are still without work. we'll get the latest numbers on friday and no doubt voters will look to that as a cue to how obama has done. >>> opposition commanders in syria feared government forces would use a cease-fire to rebuild their strength and they say that's what's happened. they claim government pilots have escalated their bombing campaign. both sides said they would lay down their arms to observe the muslim holiday. neither side respected the truce. human rights activists say mo
. i had a good feeling that romney was going to be a better candidate for the economy. not bowl. obama. >> many offices in history manhattan remain closed. new york city officials have struggled to turn power back on after hurricane sandy hit last week. >>> following an overnight plunge on wall street tokyo share prices are falling thursday morning. the key nikkei arm now currently standing at 8888. that is down 84 points, or just about 1%. investors placing sell orders on especially export-related issues. currencies, the dollar is currently being sold against the yen. worries about u.s. and european economies. the dollar/yen, 79.96-80.01. the euro/yen, 102.01-06. market players are buying the yen, it's regarded as a relatively safe asset amid pessimistic factors. those include the overnight sell-off on wall street, as well as the grim economic outlook for the eurozone which was released on wednesday. take a look at some of the asian indecks as well. australia's index, it is down .75% at 4483. >>> obama's going to spend much of his time until the end of the year trying to avoid the fis
time. but most to have the money was spent by supporters of mitt romney, and it didn't win the electorate. so should we be caring anymore? is it okay for them to be throwing their money away if they want to and the message not getting through? >> well, i felt it was a perfect example of free market economies, right? all the money that was spent -- what was it, $8 million -- i think it was $800 million, relative to $500 million on the left. didn't work. the electorate made their voice known and i think what's particularly powerful is this is an election cycle where i think the american public, for the first time in a long time, said enough is enough all the horrible things that were being said about women, in fact, insured many women's victory because a vote for mccaskill was against the horrible things akin was saying. not so much a vote for donnelly, but a vote for the things his opponent was saying. so i think citizens united already demonstrated itself to not have the overweaning preemptive effect that was predicted. >> first of all, if you add at what both candidates sp
electoral votes. mitt romney won 24 states, with 206 electoral votes. the president outpolled romney by close to 3.3 million votes. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: arizona officials today declared that democratic house candidate kyrsten sinema won her race for the ninth district, which means she will be the first openly bisexual person to serve in congress. her election follows some strong messages sent last week by voters in favor of gay couples exchanging vows. ray suarez has our look. >> suarez: for the first time supporters of same-sex marriage won at the ballot box last week. after more than 30 losses. washington state, maryland, and maine became the first states to approve the practice by popular vote. and in minnesota, voters shot down a proposed state constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage. >> it means everything. all my friends, all my community, you know, i mean, i love this state so much. >> suarez: before last tuesday, marriage for same-sex couples was legal in six states and the district of columbia but those measures were pa
mitt romney on, didn't make it. >> yeah. in fact, the success on the part of americans crossroads was less than 2%. it was a little bit better for crossroads g.p.s., 14% purpose there were groups, including those backing house runners that had a much higher rate of return, in the 60% range. what you saw this time around were the really big winners were the liberal groups-- planned parenthood. 98% success rate. now of course that's because most of their money went for obama, i believe. service employees international union, around an 80% return on its investment. afscme, same thing. and environmental groups as well did quite well. so you had a much higher rate of return on the part of these liberal groups. again, i tnk part ofhat they did was they spent their money early. they really target third money. what we've always heard from political scientists is there's a point of diminishing return with big money. what you really need a threshold minimum to get your message out. and after that, more is not necessarily better. but i think that's part of what this election illustrate. >> w
at some of the c.e.o.s of these companies also coincidentally they were romney supporters. so you had to start to drill a little bit deeper to find out what was behind all these changes. >> tom: we've got two here where we will set aside politics and look at business fundamentals. beginning with papa johns. pzza, its owner sbeen a veryocal oonent of health insurance reform. the stock has sold off along with the broad market although it rallied some today saying that it could add as much as 20 cents per pizza if it were to go through with the health-care reform law. >> right, that's what the c.e.o. said. he said that he was can going to cut his employees hours back so they wouldn't be full-time employees. but when you start to dig through the company's earnings in their most recent quarter, they did have some issues with the company. and specifically on the cost side. they had plenty of money to pay the managers bonuses. they had money for conferences. in fact, the only costs that had actually come down for them had been the cost of cheese. everything else was up. their advertising cos
there, based on what mr. romney said he would do in the first day. richard mcgregor, financial times, ian bremmer, you're eurasia group, stay with us, we will be right back. >> rose: sir and they have told tolstoy's anna karenina into a film, one against directed by jim wright and the movie find new ways to tell a love story that is familiar to all of us. here is the trailer for the film. ♪ >> i got married but it was not love. we must all cherish him for russia's sake. >> romantic love is the last illusion of the old order. >> he is a rich, good-looking cavalry officer. >> i must warn you about something. >> warn me? >> you may find indiscretion, give the world a reason to talk about you. >> if you have any shortcoming you will give me back my peace. >> will will be no peace for us, only misery. there will be no peace for us. >> we are bound together by god and can only be prone by a crime against god. >> it is not something, it is everything. >> you will destroy yourself. >> it is the misuse of something sacred. >> the man who can't govern his wife has gone as far as he can go in
saw a storm this bad? >> i haven't. >> romney's been trying to walk this fine line between maintaining a public presence while the east coast was getting battered by hurricane sandy. > sandy. >> rose: i'm with governor christie on one thing-- it is very difficult to think about these polls right now when you look at the picture pictures that we've just been seeing. >> we'll rebuild it. no question in my mind, we'll rebuild it. but for those of us who are my age, it won't be the same. >> and action! >> rose: flyis robert zemeckis' new movie. it stars denzel washington as an alcoholic airline pilot who miraculously lands his plane after a midair disaster. here is the trailer for the film. ♪ ♪ >> good morning, captain whitaker. >> 102 souls on board. ( beeping ) >> how you feeling? saved a lot of lives. ( alarm sounding ) >> everybody in brace positions the way you landed that plain was nothing short of a miracle. >> listen to me. >> the plane fell apart at 30,000 feet. >> we're going to roll it. ready? here we go. ♪ ♪ >> come on, baby girl. there are all kind of crazy newspeopl
in this debate of any depth. >> to the contrary what you have from the republican mitt romney is belittlement of the debate. during his acceptance speech in tampa he tried to make fun of the president for even talking about it. so it basically has been off the table during this debate. >> rose: this is what you say. you quote david owen whose book was the conundrum. he states as long as the west places high values onconic growth a word you hear every day and consumer gratification with the rest of them right behind continue to burn the fossil fuels whose emissions tress pass the atmosphere, fluorescent lightbulbs, they're just not enough he says. >> it's a brilliant book but brilliant and pessimistic. his point is really even larger than what we're talking about. his point is that some of our most cherished values, the idea that the economy should always be growing, the idea tt consumers wants and needs should always be served and that that is essential to the culture being healthy. his point is that actually until those attitudes change, we're not going to take serious steps. >> rose: it w
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)